Tuesday, August 22, 2006

Guilty Pleasure...

Today I proudly present the adorable Steve Sandvoss. Born in New York, Sandvoss grew up in the suburbs of New York City. He attended school there and Connecticut before enrolling at Harvard University. At Harvard, Steve was active in artistic community, pursuing amateur photography, studying poetry, and American prose, and often choosing edgier roles in student-written plays as well as in such classics as Shakespeare. In addition, he directed readings of his own work at Harvard and wrote criticism and essays for several undergraduate periodicals. While in college, he was also breaking into modeling and acting in New York. He graduated from Harvard with the distinction Cum Laude and moved to Los Angeles.

Once arrived in Los Angeles, Steve wasted no time and made an impressive feature-film debut in the 2003 independent film Latter Days. In it he played as the sweet and innocent Elder Aaron Davis, a Mormon missionary from Idaho who moves to Los Angeles and falls in love with a West Hollywood party boy, played by Wes Ramsey. The film received great response in the gay community, and Steve was then nominated for Outstanding Lead actor in the 2005 International Gay Film Awards. Personally, I think he plays gay better than some of the gay guys. The boy carries this movie. Not only is he drop-dead gorgeous, but his charm and commitment to the role are thoroughly convincing, too bad he claims to be straight.

Steve may not be a blond muscled hunk, but there's something about his body and his look, and what he does with his eyes, that I just find so engaging and endearing and irresistable! JUST LOOK AT HIM! He definitely is one of the top boys in my Book of Beauty.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

He needs a bit of colour in that first pic.

Joe said...

He and I are one day away from sharing the same birthday!

Anonymous said...

Well Pr8, I've been thinking these same thoughts as you have about Sandvos. I'm glad we concur in this one, too. I think one of the things good actors learn to do, is project their inner selves out in their portrayal of the characters they play. They are involved in a very complex aesthetic action of trying to convincingly communicate or make present the emotional, mental, and spiritual reality of another person. When they are sucessful at it, it is a beautiful performance, and they have created an "object" of beauty, that speaks deeply on many levels to those who contemplate it and receive the aesthetic delight it bears for them.

Sandvos is getting really good at this, and as a result, has learned to use everything he's got, physique, body language, facial expressions, eyes, to radiate the identity he is projecting. Actors of great talent use their eyes to drive home all that they are trying to portray, so their "eye work" is partucularly important to their art. p